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by GD Jasuja  April 27, 2011 6:31 pm

New Cloth Market Editorial 

(April 2011)

"Union Budget 2011-2012 : The Garment Industry Given Back to the Babu Raj"
GD Jasuja - Editor
 
Some of the highlights of the Union Budget presented by the Union Finance Minister, Shri Pranab Mukherjee, are :
 
• A mandatory Excise duty of 10% imposed on ready made garments and textile made ups bearing a brand name or sold under a brand name.
 
• An excise duty of 5 percent imposed on automatic looms and projectile looms.
 
• Excise duty is reduced from 10% to 5% on parts of specified textile machinery.
 
• Excise duty rate of 10% on Man-made fibre textiles remains unchanged.
 
• Peak rate of customs duty retained at 10%.
 
• Basic custom duty on raw silk (not thrown) reduced from 30% to 5 percent.
 
• Basic customs duty reduced from 5% to 2.5% on certain textile intermediates.
 
• Basic customs duty on certain specified inputs for manufacture of certain technical fibre and yarn reduced from 7.5 percent to 5 percent.
 
• Cotton waste fully exempted from basic customs duty.
 
• Basic customs duty on Poly Tetra Methylene Ether Glycol (PTMEG) and Diphenylmethane 4, 4- Diisocyanate (MDI) reduced from 7.5 percent to 5 percent subject to actual user condition.
 
• Basic Customs duty reduced from 5 percent to 2.5 percent on Acrylonitrile.
 
• Basic Customs duty reduced from 7.5 percent to 5 percent on Sodium Polyacrylate. Basic Customs reduced from 10% to 7.5 percent on Caprolactum.
 
• Basic Customs duty reduced from 10% to 7.5% on Nylon chips, fibre & yarn.
 
• Basic customs duty reduced from 5% to 2.5% on rayon grade wood pulp.
 
• Service tax rate retained at 10%. Exemption provided to services provided by an organizer of business exhibitions in relation to business exhibitions held outside India. Value of Airfreight included in the assessable value of goods for charging customs duties excluded from taxable value for the purpose of levy of service tax under the “Transport of goods by air service”. Exemption from service tax on membership fees under “Club or association service” given to the associations or chambers representing industry or commerce for the period from 16th June 2005 to 31st March 2008.
 
• Rs.3100 Crores allocated under the TUF Scheme.
 
• To quicken the clearance of the cargo by customs and further modernize the customs administration, the Budget has proposed to introduce self-assessment in customs. Under this, importers and exporters will, themselves, assess their duty liabilities while filing their declarations in the EDI system. The department will verify such assessments on a selective system driven basis. Taking into account the fact that there have been considerable difficulties in the sanction of refunds relating to service tax paid on services used for export of goods, the Budget has proposed to shortly introduce a scheme for the refund of these taxes on the lines of duty drawback in a far more simplified and expeditious manner.

GD Jasuja

by GD Jasuja   6:07 pm

CONTENTS

APRIL 2011
(VOL. 25, NO. 4)
 
7 EDITORIALL : "Union Budget 2011-12 : Garment Industry Given Back to the Babu Raj"
 
11 EXECUTIVE PAGES
 
* Recipe for Wrinkle Resistant Finish from Kunal 
* Embroidered carbon-fibre-reinforced composite RSE-fabric 
* The High-tech World of Marine Fabrics
* An Overview Of Protective Clothing (PC)
* High Level Chinese Delegation Visits SRTEPC 
* Colourtex Recipe for 100% PES Rusgulla Fabric
* 'Comfort Mapping' to Enhance Next Generation Sportswear
 
34 Application Quality Methods In Garment Production
 
43 Potential Applications of Nanofiber TEXTILE Covered by Carbon Coatings
 
48 Odor Absorbing Hydrocolloid Dressings for Direct Wound Contact
 
56 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES
 
* Lead Time Management in the Garment Sector of Bangladesh 
* Clothing & Textiles Industry in Moldova
* The Sourcing Issues From Around the Globe : Focus on Egypt
* Improving the Global Competitiveness of Textile Industry in China by Producing Ecological Textiles
* Market Trends for Textile and Apparel Products
* International News & Developments 
 
96 NEWS BRIEFS
by GD Jasuja   5:40 pm

CONTENTS

MARCH 2011
(VOL. 25, NO. 3)
 
7 EDITORIAL : "CURB THE LATE PAYMENT CULTURE, THE EU WAY"
 
13 EXECUTIVE PAGES
 
* Recipe for Wrinkle Resistant Finish from Kunal 
* Construction and Modelling Dresses 
* Colourtex Recipe for 100% PES Rusgulla Fabric
* Countrywise Export of Denim From India 
* Textile-reinforced Concrete Pedestrian Bridge : Technology Transfer Offer from Germany 
* List Of IEMs Filed From Jan 31 to Feb 4, 2011
* Nano-Enabled Protective Textiles
* Water Use in Textile Dyeing & Finishing for Profitable Environmental Improvement
 
39 THE DYEING OF POLYPROPYLENE FIBRES IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUID
 
46 CLOTHING RELATED HEALTH PROBLEMS OF FARM WORKERS 
 
51 A REPORT ON TEX-TRENDS INDIA 2011
 
56 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES
 
* Chemicals in Textiles : Practical Advice for Companies in These Sectors 
* Greenpeace Report On China Reveals  “The Dirty Secret Behind Jeans and Bras” 
* A Report On Improving Productivity in Egypt’s Ready-Made Garments Sector
* Japanese Market for Bangladesh’s RMG  Industry
* 16th Techtextil and 6th Avantex Symposium
* International News & Developments 
 
96 NEWS BRIEFS
by ganari  January 7, 2011 3:38 am
NOVEMBER 2010
(VOL. 24, NO. 11)
 
7 EDITORIAL : "INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY AND LEARN
RISK MANAGEMENT TO COUNTER/NEUTRALIZE THE
IMPACT OF RISING RUPEE"
 
13 EXECUTIVE PAGES
 
* Recipe for Wrinkle Resistant Finish from Kunal
* US Apparel Retailers Start Looking Beyond China
* Molecular Mfg. for Clean Low Cost Production
* Swiss Textile Federation : A Profile
* Techtextil N. America Symposium (15-17/3/2011)
* Remote Monitoring of Patients with Healthwear
* 31st AGM of Apparel Export Promotion Council
* IT Adoption in the Apparel Industry
* Body Scanning for Well-fitting Garments
* Colourtex Recipe for PES Rus-Gulla Dress
 
38 UV PROTECTED TEXTILES : AN OVERVIEW
 
52 ENJOY THE SUN SAFELY – TEXTILE UV PROTECTION
 
56 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES
 
Bringing HOPE to Haiti's Apparel Industry –
Improving Competitiveness through Factory
Level Value-chain Analysis
 
96 News Briefs
by GD Jasuja   3:24 am

Editorial – January 2011

The World Welcomes 2011 With High Hopes

GD Jasuja - EditorThere is a general feeling that the world markets are on the recovery path after the nightmares of 2008 and 2009. This is especially true for the textile industry where we notice an upswing, even in so-called high-labor-cost countries – like Switzerland, Germany, Italy and even the United States – where leading machinery manufacturers have started reporting higher demand for their specialised machinery thanks to the booming Asian markets. In view of increasing purchasing power, consumers in these emerging markets are demanding better quality products and are ready to pay a premium for the branded goods. There is also considerable growth in demand in these countries.
 
The Swiss textile machinery makers – Uster Technologies AG and Loepfe Brothers Ltd. – are reported to have confirmed that the demand for machineries that help in quality control and quality enhancement has particularly grown steeply due to greater emphasis being put on obtaining improved product quality. The spinning sector has shown considerable growth as this sector is mainly responsible for controlling a number of basic and fundamental parameters which affect both quality and costs including that of the raw material. Since the raw material contributes to 55%-65% of total production costs, it is vital to maximize the yield and minimize waste. Therefore, to ensure a very efficient overall process/production management mills need to have appropriate instruments, measurements and systematic analysis.
 
Similarly, the demand for weaving machineries and that for non-wovens and technical textiles is also on the rise globally. There is increasing interest in digital printing, too. The increased demand for textile machineries is reported from countries like China, India, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand and South Korea. Most stakeholders in the industry are hopeful that 2011 will be an even better year, thanks also to the forthcoming ITMA 2011 in Barcelona which will be a good indicator to gauge the industry’s performance and direction. The upswing recorded by some countries are : Germany (7.1%), Italy (6.0%), Brazil (4.8%) and the US (3.8%). People are expecting that the current positive trend will not only continue but will get a boost due to the forthcoming ITMA in Barcelona.
However, the main concern, at present, is the volatility prevailing among the major world currencies such as the U.S. dollar, the euro and the renminbi. Another difficulty being faced by the textile industry, in particular, are the high market prices of key raw materials such as cotton that play a dominant role in deciding the health of the industry.
 
In spite of these concerns, there is a widespread ‘feel good’ effect and the overall outlook for the new year clearly seems to be quite positive. So, let’s welcome 2011 with open and optimistic mind. NCM wishes its readers a very very Happy and Prosperous New Year.

GD Jasuja

by ganari   3:05 am
DECEMBER 2010
(VOL. 24, NO. 12)

7 EDITORIAL : "THINK GLOBALLY, ACT STRATEGICALLY"

11 EXECUTIVE PAGES

 

* Recipe for Wrinkle Resistant Finish from Kunal

* Nano Textiles : Facts Behind the Fabrics

* Karl Meyer's TM2 Tricot M/c for Mattress Covers

* 3D Fibrin Textiles for the Biomedical Sector

* Alexium Inc:Leader in Reactive Surface Treatment

* Cornleaf Yarn from PLA Biopolymer

* Montex 6500-6F Stenter for Yelcin Tekstil, Turkey  

* Trutzscler Spinning Machines for Vietnam

* German Textile Machinery in Brazil

* Colourtex Recipe for 100% PES Rusgulla Fabric

 

34 INTERNATIONAL DENIM CONFERENCE

ORGANISED BY TEXTILE ASSOCIATION (INDIA) –

AHMEDABAD UNIT AND FIBRE2FASHION.COM

AT IIM, AHMEDABAD

42 ENGYME BIOTECHNOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABLE  TEXTILES

58 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES

 

* The Impact of World Recession on the Textile  and Garment Industries of Asia

* Retail Apparel Market in Canada

 

* International News & Developments

94 News Briefs

by ganari   2:55 am
JANUARY 2011
(VOL. 25, NO. 1)
 
 
 
* Recipe for Anti-Microbial Finish from Kunal
* Construction and Modelling Garment
* New Technologies in Textile Dyeing & Finishing
* Avoiding Fabric Holes Caused by Needle Cuts
* Acoustic Cloth Senses, Emits Sonic Signals
* Nano-Textiles : Manufacturing & Applications
* Linen Fibres With a Difference  
* Colourtex Recipe for PES Royal Crepe Fabric
 
 
 
 
 
* RFID Benefits : Supply Chain Management in European Textile Industry
* List of Buying Houses in UAE and Germany
* International News & Developments
 
by GD Jasuja   2:39 am
Editorial : December 2010
Editorial : Think Globally, Act Strategically
 
GD Jasuja - EditorThe current cotton crisis prevailing in the textile industries of various countries – that have a very dominant textile sector – is one of the irritating side effects of the policy of liberalization, modernisation and globalisation, which is now reasonably well established as a global phenomenon. And, as per the forecast made decades ago, it gives very little control to any one country for manipulating the core principles of the new world order.
We are living in a world (fashionably called "Global Village") where every country is connected with other countries in some way or the other, especially in the economic and financial domains. If one country makes any move to protect its economic or other interests then other countries have several ready options to make that move not only worthless but even counter-productive.
The US pressure on Chinese to appreciate their currency has snowballed into a sharp increase in prices of Chinese goods being imported by the US placing the burden on the American consumers who have not yet identified cheaper and stable alternative to the Chinese.
The Indian textile industry has strongly protested against the government policy to allow export of cotton. Now if cotton is not allowed to be exported then farmers are supposed to suffer a big loss as they are not  able to get right prices for their produce. Spinners and weavers are said to gain due to lower cotton prices but do they really gain? The answer is NO. They are simply working as converters, mostly on job work basis. Do consumers are made to pay lower prices? No way. The business of the textile supply chain is quite open and the cost structure is very well known to everyone involved with the business. Under such circumstances the increasing costs are generally passed on to the last few conversion points where they are either absorbed or passed on to the end consumers. Quite often, it is not possible to pass on the burden to the consumers because higher prices adversely impact the demand causing an unwanted chain reaction backward leading to hue and cry in the whole industry. Some large composite mills and apparel makers generally find it difficult to manage the increase in prices of such raw materials and they tend to turn to government seeking policy favour instead of having a deep look into their working style and tackle issues related with productivity and quality facing them.
It is high time the industries realise and accept their weaknesses and seriously focus on improving their work practices, productivity and quality. They should stop their reliance on the government policies for making their businesses profitable. After all, we are living in an open globalised world and firmly believe that everyone should get equal opportunities to make profit and progress.
The globalisation that has developed at a remarkable speed in the recent past, has started to show off its true colours. However, one factor which clearly emerges is that there is an outstanding potential for long-term partnerships across the world. Collaboration with various stakeholders increases the competitiveness, opens up new market opportunities and facilitates entry into newer markets. The need of the hour is to really modernise not only the production and marketing facilities but also the mindset that works behind the business. How many of Indian manufacturers can produce their goods of a given quality as efficiently and as economically, which their Chinese counterparts are able to do even with the same cost of inputs? It's time to think globally and act strategically. Right?

The current cotton crisis prevailing in the textile industries of various countries – that have a very dominant textile sector – is one of the irritating side effects of the policy of liberalization, modernisation and globalisation, which is now reasonably well established as a global phenomenon. And, as per the forecast made decades ago, it gives very little control to any one country for manipulating the core principles of the new world order.

We are living in a world (fashionably called "Global Village") where every country is connected with other countries in some way or the other, especially in the economic and financial domains. If one country makes any move to protect its economic or other interests then other countries have several ready options to make that move not only worthless but even counter-productive.

The US pressure on Chinese to appreciate their currency has snowballed into a sharp increase in prices of Chinese goods being imported by the US placing the burden on the American consumers who have not yet identified cheaper and stable alternative to the Chinese.

The Indian textile industry has strongly protested against the government policy to allow export of cotton. Now if cotton is not allowed to be exported then farmers are supposed to suffer a big loss as they are not  able to get right prices for their produce. Spinners and weavers are said to gain due to lower cotton prices but do they really gain? The answer is NO. They are simply working as converters, mostly on job work basis. Do consumers are made to pay lower prices? No way. The business of the textile supply chain is quite open and the cost structure is very well known to everyone involved with the business. Under such circumstances the increasing costs are generally passed on to the last few conversion points where they are either absorbed or passed on to the end consumers. Quite often, it is not possible to pass on the burden to the consumers because higher prices adversely impact the demand causing an unwanted chain reaction backward leading to hue and cry in the whole industry. Some large composite mills and apparel makers generally find it difficult to manage the increase in prices of such raw materials and they tend to turn to government seeking policy favour instead of having a deep look into their working style and tackle issues related with productivity and quality facing them.

It is high time the industries realise and accept their weaknesses and seriously focus on improving their work practices, productivity and quality. They should stop their reliance on the government policies for making their businesses profitable. After all, we are living in an open globalised world and firmly believe that everyone should get equal opportunities to make profit and progress.

The globalisation that has developed at a remarkable speed in the recent past, has started to show off its true colours. However, one factor which clearly emerges is that there is an outstanding potential for long-term partnerships across the world. Collaboration with various stakeholders increases the competitiveness, opens up new market opportunities and facilitates entry into newer markets. The need of the hour is to really modernise not only the production and marketing facilities but also the mindset that works behind the business. How many of Indian manufacturers can produce their goods of a given quality as efficiently and as economically, which their Chinese counterparts are able to do even with the same cost of inputs? It's time to think globally and act strategically. Right?

GD Jasuja

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