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by ganari  January 7, 2011 3:05 am
DECEMBER 2010
(VOL. 24, NO. 12)

7 EDITORIAL : "THINK GLOBALLY, ACT STRATEGICALLY"

11 EXECUTIVE PAGES

 

* Recipe for Wrinkle Resistant Finish from Kunal

* Nano Textiles : Facts Behind the Fabrics

* Karl Meyer's TM2 Tricot M/c for Mattress Covers

* 3D Fibrin Textiles for the Biomedical Sector

* Alexium Inc:Leader in Reactive Surface Treatment

* Cornleaf Yarn from PLA Biopolymer

* Montex 6500-6F Stenter for Yelcin Tekstil, Turkey  

* Trutzscler Spinning Machines for Vietnam

* German Textile Machinery in Brazil

* Colourtex Recipe for 100% PES Rusgulla Fabric

 

34 INTERNATIONAL DENIM CONFERENCE

ORGANISED BY TEXTILE ASSOCIATION (INDIA) –

AHMEDABAD UNIT AND FIBRE2FASHION.COM

AT IIM, AHMEDABAD

42 ENGYME BIOTECHNOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABLE  TEXTILES

58 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES

 

* The Impact of World Recession on the Textile  and Garment Industries of Asia

* Retail Apparel Market in Canada

 

* International News & Developments

94 News Briefs

by ganari   2:55 am
JANUARY 2011
(VOL. 25, NO. 1)
 
 
 
* Recipe for Anti-Microbial Finish from Kunal
* Construction and Modelling Garment
* New Technologies in Textile Dyeing & Finishing
* Avoiding Fabric Holes Caused by Needle Cuts
* Acoustic Cloth Senses, Emits Sonic Signals
* Nano-Textiles : Manufacturing & Applications
* Linen Fibres With a Difference  
* Colourtex Recipe for PES Royal Crepe Fabric
 
 
 
 
 
* RFID Benefits : Supply Chain Management in European Textile Industry
* List of Buying Houses in UAE and Germany
* International News & Developments
 
by GD Jasuja   2:39 am
Editorial : December 2010
Editorial : Think Globally, Act Strategically
 
GD Jasuja - EditorThe current cotton crisis prevailing in the textile industries of various countries – that have a very dominant textile sector – is one of the irritating side effects of the policy of liberalization, modernisation and globalisation, which is now reasonably well established as a global phenomenon. And, as per the forecast made decades ago, it gives very little control to any one country for manipulating the core principles of the new world order.
We are living in a world (fashionably called "Global Village") where every country is connected with other countries in some way or the other, especially in the economic and financial domains. If one country makes any move to protect its economic or other interests then other countries have several ready options to make that move not only worthless but even counter-productive.
The US pressure on Chinese to appreciate their currency has snowballed into a sharp increase in prices of Chinese goods being imported by the US placing the burden on the American consumers who have not yet identified cheaper and stable alternative to the Chinese.
The Indian textile industry has strongly protested against the government policy to allow export of cotton. Now if cotton is not allowed to be exported then farmers are supposed to suffer a big loss as they are not  able to get right prices for their produce. Spinners and weavers are said to gain due to lower cotton prices but do they really gain? The answer is NO. They are simply working as converters, mostly on job work basis. Do consumers are made to pay lower prices? No way. The business of the textile supply chain is quite open and the cost structure is very well known to everyone involved with the business. Under such circumstances the increasing costs are generally passed on to the last few conversion points where they are either absorbed or passed on to the end consumers. Quite often, it is not possible to pass on the burden to the consumers because higher prices adversely impact the demand causing an unwanted chain reaction backward leading to hue and cry in the whole industry. Some large composite mills and apparel makers generally find it difficult to manage the increase in prices of such raw materials and they tend to turn to government seeking policy favour instead of having a deep look into their working style and tackle issues related with productivity and quality facing them.
It is high time the industries realise and accept their weaknesses and seriously focus on improving their work practices, productivity and quality. They should stop their reliance on the government policies for making their businesses profitable. After all, we are living in an open globalised world and firmly believe that everyone should get equal opportunities to make profit and progress.
The globalisation that has developed at a remarkable speed in the recent past, has started to show off its true colours. However, one factor which clearly emerges is that there is an outstanding potential for long-term partnerships across the world. Collaboration with various stakeholders increases the competitiveness, opens up new market opportunities and facilitates entry into newer markets. The need of the hour is to really modernise not only the production and marketing facilities but also the mindset that works behind the business. How many of Indian manufacturers can produce their goods of a given quality as efficiently and as economically, which their Chinese counterparts are able to do even with the same cost of inputs? It's time to think globally and act strategically. Right?

The current cotton crisis prevailing in the textile industries of various countries – that have a very dominant textile sector – is one of the irritating side effects of the policy of liberalization, modernisation and globalisation, which is now reasonably well established as a global phenomenon. And, as per the forecast made decades ago, it gives very little control to any one country for manipulating the core principles of the new world order.

We are living in a world (fashionably called "Global Village") where every country is connected with other countries in some way or the other, especially in the economic and financial domains. If one country makes any move to protect its economic or other interests then other countries have several ready options to make that move not only worthless but even counter-productive.

The US pressure on Chinese to appreciate their currency has snowballed into a sharp increase in prices of Chinese goods being imported by the US placing the burden on the American consumers who have not yet identified cheaper and stable alternative to the Chinese.

The Indian textile industry has strongly protested against the government policy to allow export of cotton. Now if cotton is not allowed to be exported then farmers are supposed to suffer a big loss as they are not  able to get right prices for their produce. Spinners and weavers are said to gain due to lower cotton prices but do they really gain? The answer is NO. They are simply working as converters, mostly on job work basis. Do consumers are made to pay lower prices? No way. The business of the textile supply chain is quite open and the cost structure is very well known to everyone involved with the business. Under such circumstances the increasing costs are generally passed on to the last few conversion points where they are either absorbed or passed on to the end consumers. Quite often, it is not possible to pass on the burden to the consumers because higher prices adversely impact the demand causing an unwanted chain reaction backward leading to hue and cry in the whole industry. Some large composite mills and apparel makers generally find it difficult to manage the increase in prices of such raw materials and they tend to turn to government seeking policy favour instead of having a deep look into their working style and tackle issues related with productivity and quality facing them.

It is high time the industries realise and accept their weaknesses and seriously focus on improving their work practices, productivity and quality. They should stop their reliance on the government policies for making their businesses profitable. After all, we are living in an open globalised world and firmly believe that everyone should get equal opportunities to make profit and progress.

The globalisation that has developed at a remarkable speed in the recent past, has started to show off its true colours. However, one factor which clearly emerges is that there is an outstanding potential for long-term partnerships across the world. Collaboration with various stakeholders increases the competitiveness, opens up new market opportunities and facilitates entry into newer markets. The need of the hour is to really modernise not only the production and marketing facilities but also the mindset that works behind the business. How many of Indian manufacturers can produce their goods of a given quality as efficiently and as economically, which their Chinese counterparts are able to do even with the same cost of inputs? It's time to think globally and act strategically. Right?

GD Jasuja

by ganari  January 6, 2011 12:13 am

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