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by GD Jasuja  April 27, 2011 8:27 pm

New Cloth Market Editorial

(February 2011)
 
GD Jasuja - Editor
U.S. President Barack Obama recently called on Americans to achieve global competitiveness through innovation in order to win the future. He hoped that the economy was growing again leaving behind the worst recession of past two years. He mentioned China and India in his speech acknowledging that the two countries were spending more on education with greater focus on math and science, and were also investing in research and new technologies. He noted that the world had changed, the competition for jobs was real and for many, the change had been painful. However, he was quite optimistic that his country would be able to maintain it's supremacy in the world in the coming future, too. The very fact that Obama had to emphasise on winning the future clearly shows that he felt that the battle for the future was on and China and India were two strong contenders for the same. Since the battle is going to be a long drawn one, there is bound to be lot of uncertainties especially because China has authoritative one Party regime whereas India's democracy is like a lame-duck. This may perhaps help Americans to continue to be the world leaders, if they fight well the present chaos facing their economy. 
 
Talking about China, it has the most impressive economy in the world but lacks natural and other resources.  There is a possibility that with the increasing demands of its growing middle class, China could run a trade deficit along with a weakening currency in a few years time. It is also recognised that China has better government policy makers whose most of the recommendations are followed by the governing Communist Party. However, the lack of democracy and ever increasing disparities between rich and poor can act as a big destabilising force in coming years and adversely affect China's march ahead. India, on the other hand, has leadership in the IT industry and has a vast pool of English speaking reasonably qualified young boys and girls who are the basic raw material for the fast growing service industry. But India's governance is burdened with too much of corruption at every stage, infrastructure is known to be pathetic and the legal system lacks credibility. There should be no illusion that India is any where in sight competing with China.
 
Let us examine the textile and apparel industry of India and China. India had set the target to achieve $50bn exports by 2010. India's Exports in 2004-05 were $14bn and in 2005-06: $ 17bn. India's official target in 2005, at the end of the quota system, was to achieving 7-8% share in the coming three years, and about 15 to 16% by the year 2010. Today, our leaders expect to achieve 20% per annum growth in exports over the next five years which would double India’s share of the global textile industry to about 6.6%.  India expects exports to be $24bn (about 4.5% of the global trade) for the current fiscal against the estimated  $20bn in 2009-2010. Experts believe this could reach $80bn in 10 years, or 8% of the world market. 
 
China's export of textile and clothes touched $206.53bn in 2010 (Jan.-Dec.), rising 23.59% from previous year. The global trade in textiles and clothing is expected to touch around $800bn by 2014 from the current $500bn. So, the fact-of-the-matter is that we are comparing India – having an annual exports of hardly $24bn (less than 4% global share) – with China having annual exports of more than $206bn and the global share of nearly 40%. Are they comparable? Definitely, No. Even Bangladesh, Indonesia and Vietnam are performing better than India on the export front.
 
The scenario is more or less similar in almost all spheres of economic activity. Definitely, India is not in the picture when it comes to Obama's so called 'war' to win the future. This 'war' is going to be between the US and China and everyone understands that. Obama may have just mentioned India's name to downplay China's role but let us not have any illusion. Let them fight that war. As far as India is concerned, we got to manage the present well so that we not only maintain our core competencies and specialities but also try to eliminate our drawbacks, acquire newer skills and hence 'make' the future for our billion plus population in the years to come. Let us not try to 'win' the future. Instead, let us work all together to 'make' it.
 
 
by GD Jasuja   6:37 pm

 

New Cloth Market Editorial 
March 2011
 
For the Kind Attn. of the Govt. of India : Curb the Late Payment Culture, the EU Way
GD Jasuja - Editor
 
The European Parliament of Enterprises, last October, adopted the Late Payment Directive in order to eradicate Europe’s  late payment culture (in commercial transactions) which affected the cash flow of businesses across the EU. It was observed : "Many payments in commercial transactions between economic operators or between economic operators and public authorities are made later than agreed in the contract or laid down in the general commercial conditions. Although the goods are delivered or the services performed, many corresponding invoices are paid well after the deadline. Such late payment negatively affects liquid assets and complicates the financial management of enterprises.It also affects their competitiveness and profitability when the creditor needs to obtain external financing because of late payment. This risk strongly increases in periods of the economic downturn when access to financing is more difficult".The Directive further said : "Late payment constitutes a breach of contract which has been made financially attractive to debtors by low or no interest rates charged on late payments and/or slow procedures for redress. A decisive shift to a culture of prompt payment is necessary to reverse this trend and to ensure that the consequences of late payments are such as to discourage late payment.  The agreement sets a maximum cap of 60 days for payments by public authorities; this will benefit the many businesses, particularly SMEs, that provide goods and services to public bodies. All business-to-business transactions are also included under the scope of the directive. The creditor is entitled to interest  for late payment without the necessity of a reminder. Chambers will monitor closely the process over the two-year transposition period.
 
India has the worst culture of late payments across all businesses including a large number of public enterprises. When it comes to the textile industry, the situation is really pathetic. Ask any supplier, whether a dyes-chemical supplier, machinery supplier, grey cloth supplier, finished goods supplier, everyone is facing recovery problem. Most of their sales executives have become 'recovery' executives. Recently, the Federation of Gujarat Weavers'Association (FOGWA), Surat demanded that the textile traders would have to make the net payment within seven days of the receipt of grey cloth instead of three months credit which was being given to them. However, the Federation of Surat Textile Traders Association (FOSTTA) has declined to accept this.
 
The dishonour of a cheque for insufficiency, etc., of funds in the accounts is punishable with imprisonment for up to 2 years, or with fine, which may extend to twice the amount of the cheque, or with both. The affected creditor can file a Criminal Complaint u/s 138 of Negotiable Instrument Act . It was hoped that this would curb the culture of willful and frequent bouncing of cheques. Even so, offenders are losing all fear of cheque-bouncing because of long dates and extra-ordinary delay in finalisation of such cases. According to some estimates over 30 lakh cheque bounce cases were pending throughout the country. 
 
When we compare the EU scenario with that of ours, we find that we are hundreds of miles away from where they are aiming to be. However, if there area strong will and readiness to act then it should be possible in India as well. We can certainly work out some way to curb both, the late payment as well as dishonour of cheques, in a combined manner under one common law which operates automatically without the hassles of complex court procedures. A Utopian thought, but worth thinking, indeed.
 
by GD Jasuja   6:31 pm

New Cloth Market Editorial 

(April 2011)

"Union Budget 2011-2012 : The Garment Industry Given Back to the Babu Raj"
GD Jasuja - Editor
 
Some of the highlights of the Union Budget presented by the Union Finance Minister, Shri Pranab Mukherjee, are :
 
• A mandatory Excise duty of 10% imposed on ready made garments and textile made ups bearing a brand name or sold under a brand name.
 
• An excise duty of 5 percent imposed on automatic looms and projectile looms.
 
• Excise duty is reduced from 10% to 5% on parts of specified textile machinery.
 
• Excise duty rate of 10% on Man-made fibre textiles remains unchanged.
 
• Peak rate of customs duty retained at 10%.
 
• Basic custom duty on raw silk (not thrown) reduced from 30% to 5 percent.
 
• Basic customs duty reduced from 5% to 2.5% on certain textile intermediates.
 
• Basic customs duty on certain specified inputs for manufacture of certain technical fibre and yarn reduced from 7.5 percent to 5 percent.
 
• Cotton waste fully exempted from basic customs duty.
 
• Basic customs duty on Poly Tetra Methylene Ether Glycol (PTMEG) and Diphenylmethane 4, 4- Diisocyanate (MDI) reduced from 7.5 percent to 5 percent subject to actual user condition.
 
• Basic Customs duty reduced from 5 percent to 2.5 percent on Acrylonitrile.
 
• Basic Customs duty reduced from 7.5 percent to 5 percent on Sodium Polyacrylate. Basic Customs reduced from 10% to 7.5 percent on Caprolactum.
 
• Basic Customs duty reduced from 10% to 7.5% on Nylon chips, fibre & yarn.
 
• Basic customs duty reduced from 5% to 2.5% on rayon grade wood pulp.
 
• Service tax rate retained at 10%. Exemption provided to services provided by an organizer of business exhibitions in relation to business exhibitions held outside India. Value of Airfreight included in the assessable value of goods for charging customs duties excluded from taxable value for the purpose of levy of service tax under the “Transport of goods by air service”. Exemption from service tax on membership fees under “Club or association service” given to the associations or chambers representing industry or commerce for the period from 16th June 2005 to 31st March 2008.
 
• Rs.3100 Crores allocated under the TUF Scheme.
 
• To quicken the clearance of the cargo by customs and further modernize the customs administration, the Budget has proposed to introduce self-assessment in customs. Under this, importers and exporters will, themselves, assess their duty liabilities while filing their declarations in the EDI system. The department will verify such assessments on a selective system driven basis. Taking into account the fact that there have been considerable difficulties in the sanction of refunds relating to service tax paid on services used for export of goods, the Budget has proposed to shortly introduce a scheme for the refund of these taxes on the lines of duty drawback in a far more simplified and expeditious manner.

GD Jasuja

by GD Jasuja   6:07 pm

CONTENTS

APRIL 2011
(VOL. 25, NO. 4)
 
7 EDITORIALL : "Union Budget 2011-12 : Garment Industry Given Back to the Babu Raj"
 
11 EXECUTIVE PAGES
 
* Recipe for Wrinkle Resistant Finish from Kunal 
* Embroidered carbon-fibre-reinforced composite RSE-fabric 
* The High-tech World of Marine Fabrics
* An Overview Of Protective Clothing (PC)
* High Level Chinese Delegation Visits SRTEPC 
* Colourtex Recipe for 100% PES Rusgulla Fabric
* 'Comfort Mapping' to Enhance Next Generation Sportswear
 
34 Application Quality Methods In Garment Production
 
43 Potential Applications of Nanofiber TEXTILE Covered by Carbon Coatings
 
48 Odor Absorbing Hydrocolloid Dressings for Direct Wound Contact
 
56 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES
 
* Lead Time Management in the Garment Sector of Bangladesh 
* Clothing & Textiles Industry in Moldova
* The Sourcing Issues From Around the Globe : Focus on Egypt
* Improving the Global Competitiveness of Textile Industry in China by Producing Ecological Textiles
* Market Trends for Textile and Apparel Products
* International News & Developments 
 
96 NEWS BRIEFS
by GD Jasuja   5:40 pm

CONTENTS

MARCH 2011
(VOL. 25, NO. 3)
 
7 EDITORIAL : "CURB THE LATE PAYMENT CULTURE, THE EU WAY"
 
13 EXECUTIVE PAGES
 
* Recipe for Wrinkle Resistant Finish from Kunal 
* Construction and Modelling Dresses 
* Colourtex Recipe for 100% PES Rusgulla Fabric
* Countrywise Export of Denim From India 
* Textile-reinforced Concrete Pedestrian Bridge : Technology Transfer Offer from Germany 
* List Of IEMs Filed From Jan 31 to Feb 4, 2011
* Nano-Enabled Protective Textiles
* Water Use in Textile Dyeing & Finishing for Profitable Environmental Improvement
 
39 THE DYEING OF POLYPROPYLENE FIBRES IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUID
 
46 CLOTHING RELATED HEALTH PROBLEMS OF FARM WORKERS 
 
51 A REPORT ON TEX-TRENDS INDIA 2011
 
56 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES
 
* Chemicals in Textiles : Practical Advice for Companies in These Sectors 
* Greenpeace Report On China Reveals  “The Dirty Secret Behind Jeans and Bras” 
* A Report On Improving Productivity in Egypt’s Ready-Made Garments Sector
* Japanese Market for Bangladesh’s RMG  Industry
* 16th Techtextil and 6th Avantex Symposium
* International News & Developments 
 
96 NEWS BRIEFS
by GD Jasuja   5:16 pm

CONTENTS – FEBRUARY 2011

(VOL. 25, NO. 2)
 
7 EDITORIAL : LET INDIA FOCUS ON "MAKING THE FUTURE"
 
11 EXECUTIVE PAGES
 
* Constuction and Modelling Men's Trousers 
* Colourtex Recipe for 100% PES Poonam Saree
* Canal Lining with Geosynthetics
* The World of Adaptable Awnings
* Water Conservation Through Fabric Products
* Inspection of Fabric Rolls in China
* Quality Control & Inspection : Cutting Defect Rates  
* Recipe for Wrinkle Interlining Finish from Kunal 
 
35 THE TECHNOLOGY OF TERRY TOWEL PRODUCTION
 
65 THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DISPERSE DYE INKS FOR INKJET TEXTILE PRINTING
 
71 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES
 
* Fashion & Clothing:Retail Sector in Romania
* Paris Fashion Week
* Business Inquiries
* Asian Fashion Rising:Report from Hong Kong
* Texworld 2011 
* International News & Developments 
* India's Exports of Synthetic & Rayon Textiles 
 
95 NEWS BRIEFS
by ganari  January 7, 2011 5:00 am

Executive Pages : January 2011

* Recipe for Anti-Microbial Finish from Kunal
* Construction and Modelling Garment
* New Technologies in Textile Dyeing & Finishing
* Avoiding Fabric Holes Caused by Needle Cuts
* Acoustic Cloth Senses, Emits Sonic Signals
* Nano-Textiles : Manufacturing & Applications
* Linen Fibres With a Difference
* Colourtex Recipe for PES Royal Crepe Fabric
 
by GD Jasuja   3:43 am

Editorial : November 2010

Increase Productivity and Learn Risk Management to Counter/Neutralize the Impact of Rising Rupee

GD Jasuja - EditorTextile & Clothing is an important sector in India’s export basket. This sector has negligible use of imported inputs and is an employer of a large number of people in India. Rupee appreciation in the past has resulted in loss in export growth both in textile as well as in the readymade garment (RMG) sector. Clothing sector is highly labour intensive. An investment of Rs.100 Million generates 500 direct and 200 indirect jobs. Around 5.8 million people are engaged in apparel industry. Any slowdown in the export growth will adversely affect the employment generation. In fact, in many sub categories, job losses are already reported. It is estimated that for every percentage point of appreciation, profitability of exports in the textile sector is hit by 1.2%.

RBI has clearly indicated that it is going to intervene to contain the rise in rupee to avoid it’s negative impact on exporters. As India’s exports are at stake, government of India also needs to gear up to take appropriate steps to neutralize the effect of rupee appreciation, mainly in the form of providing several incentives to exporters and enhancing some of the existing ones. It is widely feared that profits will tank for the textile industry if the rupee goes below 44 against the US dollar. The rupee’s rise will certainly trim down profit margins and hit export competitiveness. Firms should, therefore, handle their foreign exchange with due care. As India is gradually getting integrated with the world economy, currency volatility will become a normal affair. Similarly, it is important for the firms – that are already enjoying several incentives for quite sometime – to enhance their productivity with the help of such incentives. Higher productivity leads to lower cost of production, and thus it can play a key role in neutralizing the loss that may occur due to currency appreciation. Within the industry also, we can see that the effect of rupee appreciation varies among firms. More productive firms can absorb the loss in a better way. Furthermore, firms need to learn sophisticated methods of risk management to maintain a favourable foreign currency hedge in view of the volatile currency market which has already become the order of the day.
Chinese are very much under pressure to appreciate their currency. The appreciation of the yuan, together with rising raw material and labor costs, has already squeezed profit margins in China’s textile industry. The yuan rose 21 percent against the U.S. dollar from 2005 to 2008. It is feared that if the yuan actually appreciates 5 percent from the current level against the U.S. dollar, then over half of China’s home textile companies will go bankrupt.
To cope with yuan appreciation, Chinese textile companies have already started vigorously promoting industry upgradation and technological innovation to achieve value addition. They have also started making structural adjustment to focus on the huge domestic market.
We got to do the same to be in the business of exports.

Textile & Clothing is an important sector in India’s export basket. This sector has negligible use of imported inputs and is an employer of a large number of people in India. Rupee appreciation in the past has resulted in loss in export growth both in textile as well as in the readymade garment (RMG) sector. Clothing sector is highly labour intensive. An investment of Rs.100 Million generates 500 direct and 200 indirect jobs. Around 5.8 million people are engaged in apparel industry. Any slowdown in the export growth will adversely affect the employment generation. In fact, in many sub categories, job losses are already reported. It is estimated that for every percentage point of appreciation, profitability of exports in the textile sector is hit by 1.2%.
RBI has clearly indicated that it is going to intervene to contain the rise in rupee to avoid it’s negative impact on exporters. As India’s exports are at stake, government of India also needs to gear up to take appropriate steps to neutralize the effect of rupee appreciation, mainly in the form of providing several incentives to exporters and enhancing some of the existing ones. It is widely feared that profits will tank for the textile industry if the rupee goes below 44 against the US dollar. The rupee’s rise will certainly trim down profit margins and hit export competitiveness. Firms should, therefore, handle their foreign exchange with due care. As India is gradually getting integrated with the world economy, currency volatility will become a normal affair. Similarly, it is important for the firms – that are already enjoying several incentives for quite sometime – to enhance their productivity with the help of such incentives. Higher productivity leads to lower cost of production, and thus it can play a key role in neutralizing the loss that may occur due to currency appreciation. Within the industry also, we can see that the effect of rupee appreciation varies among firms. More productive firms can absorb the loss in a better way. Furthermore, firms need to learn sophisticated methods of risk management to maintain a favourable foreign currency hedge in view of the volatile currency market which has already become the order of the day.
Chinese are very much under pressure to appreciate their currency. The appreciation of the yuan, together with rising raw material and labor costs, has already squeezed profit margins in China’s textile industry. The yuan rose 21 percent against the U.S. dollar from 2005 to 2008. It is feared that if the yuan actually appreciates 5 percent from the current level against the U.S. dollar, then over half of China’s home textile companies will go bankrupt.
To cope with yuan appreciation, Chinese textile companies have already started vigorously promoting industry upgradation and technological innovation to achieve value addition. They have also started making structural adjustment to focus on the huge domestic market.
We got to do the same to be in the business of exports.

GD Jasuja

by ganari   3:38 am
NOVEMBER 2010
(VOL. 24, NO. 11)
 
7 EDITORIAL : "INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY AND LEARN
RISK MANAGEMENT TO COUNTER/NEUTRALIZE THE
IMPACT OF RISING RUPEE"
 
13 EXECUTIVE PAGES
 
* Recipe for Wrinkle Resistant Finish from Kunal
* US Apparel Retailers Start Looking Beyond China
* Molecular Mfg. for Clean Low Cost Production
* Swiss Textile Federation : A Profile
* Techtextil N. America Symposium (15-17/3/2011)
* Remote Monitoring of Patients with Healthwear
* 31st AGM of Apparel Export Promotion Council
* IT Adoption in the Apparel Industry
* Body Scanning for Well-fitting Garments
* Colourtex Recipe for PES Rus-Gulla Dress
 
38 UV PROTECTED TEXTILES : AN OVERVIEW
 
52 ENJOY THE SUN SAFELY – TEXTILE UV PROTECTION
 
56 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGES
 
Bringing HOPE to Haiti's Apparel Industry –
Improving Competitiveness through Factory
Level Value-chain Analysis
 
96 News Briefs
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